Human Experience = User Experience + Customer Experience + More

As we head into 2020, I’m still obsessed with the integration of human experience. My work over the last two decades in technology has often been centered on the user or the customer. What I began to realize was first of all that when we talk about the “user“ or the “customer“ that we are always talking about humans, and that it benefits us to think in a more holistic human context when we do that.

Now I find I’m not as interested in user or customer experience as I am in human experience: what does it mean to optimize for the human experience; what does it mean to be human at all; how can that apply to businesses, marketing, to schools, to hospitals, and well beyond.

But I also find that when business focuses on improving human experience in alignment with what the business objectives are, the chances for success increase. This is why in my books and keynotes and beyond I always talk about “human-centric digital transformation.” With emerging technology, because of the increased capacity and scale that it offers, it’s becoming increasingly important that that alignment is in place so that we don’t scale unintended consequences.

I believe some of the biggest opportunities right now for the future of human experience — and indeed the future of humanity in general — are in looking at the ways online meets offline, customer meets user, employee meets candidate, global meets local, how the gig economy is shaking up the work landscape, and on and on.

We’ll have to think about context, environment, culture, aesthetics, identity. We’ll have to think about the human journey instead of the customer journey.

We’ll have to think about metrics that measure the human experience. What will those be? How do you measure fulfillment? A life well lived?

This moment in history feels very chaotic, where automation, artificial intelligence, and other emerging technologies are rapidly changing our vision of even the near future. Meanwhile, 70-80% of CEOs think the next 3 years are more critical than the past 50. We’re clearly in a truly transformative time.

So there’s tremendous opportunity for UX and CX professionals to put a stake in the ground on behalf of a wider lens on humanity, and advocate for integrated human experiences in the midst of machine-driven interactions and transactions, to make them as meaningful as possible.

Experience Timeline by Technology Era

To understand what constitutes experience and what has constituted experience throughout different eras of technology, I offer this timeline of what characterized and will characterize experiences throughout the major eras of recent and forthcoming technology. We are somewhere around the social-enabled and “smart” era, with elements of the “intelligent” era beginning to show up and legacy remnants of the previous eras still left behind.

To understand what constitutes experience and what has constituted experience throughout different eras of technology, I offer this timeline of what characterized and will characterize experiences throughout the major eras of recent and forthcoming technology. We are somewhere around the social-enabled and “smart” era, with elements of the “intelligent” era beginning to show up and legacy remnants of the previous eras still left behind.

Experience Timeline by Technology Era

platform? context? (not eras, because many overlap)

analog (industrial/pre-industrial?)

digital

web-enabled

social-enabled

“smart”/connected data sources

“intelligent”/AI

fully virtual / ambient virtual

characterized by

solid state, tangible

electronic, power-operated

interlinked, global knowledge, global village

social sharing, FOMO, FONS, selfie culture

data tracking, anticipatory based on past behavior, algorithmic

anticipatory based on externalities, secondary behaviors, cognitive cues, emotional indicators

dominant eras

??-?? (ongoing)

19th century – ?? (ongoing)

1990s – ?? (ongoing)

2000s – ?? (ongoing)

2010s – ?? (ongoing)

2010/20s – ?? (ongoing)

automation

mechanical

electronic

interlinked

social triggers

algorithmic

anticipatory

dominant interface

tactile

tactile, impulse?, text

desktop screen, text, images

mobile screen, text, videos

voice

voice, gesture, ambient

sensory interactions

buttons, dials, levers, etc

typing, mouse, visual cues

typing, mouse, visual cues

typing, touch, visual interactions

buttons, keypads, visual displays, voice

visual

y

y

y

y

y

y

tactile

y

y

y

audio

indicators

indicators

content

content

interactions

Interactions, triggers

ambient cues

kinesthetic

motion-powered

gestures to trigger sensors

gestures to interact

olfactory

detect gas leaks, detect coffee smell

simulate aromas?

taste

simulate taste?

What does placemaking look like in each context?

What does business need to do to innovate in each?

What do meaningful human experiences look like in each context?

What is the future of meaningful human experience?

The future of meaningful human experience is multi-sensory, contextual, dimensional, integrated, intelligent, responsive, anticipatory, adaptive, and inclusive.

 

Beyond Customer Experience

Businesses are finally starting to catch on that a disciplined approach to improving the customer experience leads to profit. That’s the starting point, and it’s fantastic.

But what’s the next step? What’s beyond improving the customer experience?

Well, we can think about the customer not merely as a customer, but as a well-rounded human being, who takes on many roles throughout the course of a day: patient, student, user, guest, citizen, not to mention friend, employee, parent, and so on. We can improve the human experience.

How can we improve human experience? How can we think about those many roles we all have in a business context, and why should we?

Those additional roles become dimensions of the person you’re trying to do business with. The more dimensional that person is to you, the more likely you’ll be able to offer them value. When you offer them value, you establish the basis of a meaningful relationship.

We always have to look for the human nuances if we want to build meaning.