Engati Recognizes Kate O’Neill as one of the ‘Top 30 Marketing Influencers you need to follow for 2021’

Kate O’Neill has been recognized as one of the top 30 marketing influencers by Engati. The list includes marketing leaders, entrepreneurs, and thinkers the likes of Mark Schaefer, Chief Operating Officer at B Squared Media, LLC, Jeff Barrett, Global Influence and Communications Consultant at Adobe, Roger Dooley, a global keynote speaker and a Neuromarketing genius, and marketing technologist Michael King.

While KO Insights is not a marketing company, per se, we follow the Peter Drucker reasoning on marketing: that its purpose is to know and understand a customer. And since we value knowledge and understanding, particularly that of humans, we’re excited to share this honor with you.

New Biometric Privacy Law Goes Into Place in NYC on Friday July 9, 2021

Image by teguhjatipras, CC0, via Wikimedia Commons

Beginning July 9, all New York City commercial businesses that obtain customers’ biometric information must comply with a newly enacted protocol that protects consumers.

Commercial businesses that obtain biometric data from customers will be required to post signs on storefronts signifying they utilize this technology and will not be able to profit from any collected data. Additionally, employees of companies that utilize the technology are excluded from this ordinance.

http://newyorkcitywired.com/biometric-data-protected-in-new-york-city/

This Friday New York will join a growing list of cities that have banned the use of facial recognition and other biometrics in certain contexts and for certain purposes. The law was enacted by the city council in December.

Under the new law, any commercial establishment that collects, retains, converts, stores, or shares biometric information from customers must post a conspicuous sign near the establishment’s entrances notifying customers in plain language that their information is being collected, retained, converted, stored, or shared. Notably, “biometric information” is defined in broad terms to include a retina or iris scan, fingerprint or voice print, scan of hand, or face geometry, “or any other identifying characteristic.” The law also prohibits receiving anything of value in exchange for biometric information.

https://www.nixonpeabody.com/en/ideas/blog/data-privacy/2021/02/18/nyc-biometric-privacy-legislation-targets-retail-use-of-facial-recognition-technology

Failure to comply with the law can cost businesses between $500 and $5,000 for each violation, plus attorneys’ fees — so it’ll be worth it to read up on it and make sure you’re in compliance.


More posts about facial recognition in the KO Insights blog.